Narsarsuaq Airport Greenland airports - Narsarsuaq Airport
Greenland airports
Greenlandic airports
World airports
Airport photos - free!
Aircraft photos - free!
Spacecraft pics - free!
Aviation articles

Narsarsuaq Airport



Narsarsuaq Airport
Mittarfik Narsarsuaq
Narsarsuaq Lufthavn
Narsarsuaq Airport
IATA: UAK – ICAO: BGBW
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Mittarfeqarfiit
Serves Narsarsuaq
Elevation AMSL 112 ft / 34 m
Coordinates 61°09′39″N 045°25′32″W / 61.16083°N 45.42556°W / 61.16083; -45.42556 (Narsarsuaq Airport)Coordinates: 61°09′39″N 045°25′32″W / 61.16083°N 45.42556°W / 61.16083; -45.42556 (Narsarsuaq Airport)
Website Narsarsuaq Lufthavn
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
07/25 1,830 6,004 Concrete
Source: Danish AIS

Narsarsuaq Airport (Kalaallisut: Mittarfik Narsarsuaq) (IATA: UAK, ICAO: BGBW) is an airport located in Narsarsuaq, a settlement in the Kujalleq municipality in southern Greenland. Alongside Kangerlussuaq Airport it is one of two airports in Greenland capable of serving large airliners. It is also the only international airport in southern Greenland. The settlement it serves is small, with the airport primarily functioning as a transfer point for passengers heading for the helicopter hubs of Air Greenland in Qaqortoq and Nanortalik.

History


Terminal at Narsarsuaq Airport
Terminal at Narsarsuaq Airport

World War II

The airfield at Narsarsuaq was first built by the American Department of Defense (then known as the War Department) as an army airbase, its construction beginning in July 1941 and the first aircraft landing in January 1942. During World War II the airbase−codenamed Bluie West One−hosted squadrons of PBY Catalina flying boats and B-25 Mitchell bombers with the assignment to escort allied convoys and track and destroy German submarines.

A military hospital with 250 beds was completed in 1943. Approximately 4,000 people were stationed at the base during the war. It is estimated that during that time more than 10,000 aircraft were ferried through the airbase. On 6 July 1942 the supply ship "SS Montrose" was wrecked on a cliff in the Tunulliarfik Fjord southwest of the airbase. The first aircraft from the Danish Air Force stationed at Narsarsuaq was a PBY Catalina in 1947 and a B-17 Flying Fortress in 1948.

After the War


Air Greenland serves all primary heliports in southern Greenland with a Sikorsky S-61N helicopter
Air Greenland serves all primary heliports in southern Greenland with a Sikorsky S-61N helicopter

Civil air traffic began in 1949 with DC-4s from the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) and Icelandair. USA and Denmark signed The Agreement related to the defense of Greenland on 27 April 1951, with both countries agreeing to share the Bluie West One airbase. In 1952 the Danish Air Force stationed Airgroup West with a PBY Catalina at the airport.

The US Air Force left Bluie West One in November 1958, and the airbase was closed. In January 1959 M/S Hans Hedtoft of Denmark and all onboard were lost near the southern tip of Greenland. The Danish Authorities decided to reopen the airport soon after. From November 1959 Danish Air Force had 3 PBY Catalinas stationed at Narsarsuaq with the assignment to make ice-observations along the coast of Greenland, and these observations was broadcast to ships in the area.


Atlantic Airways connected Narsarsuaq with Iceland
Atlantic Airways connected Narsarsuaq with Iceland

In 1960 Greenlandair (since 2002 known as Air Greenland) was formed as a regional airline of Greenland. It began operations with a Sikorsky S-55 and a Douglas DC-4. From 1962 Greenlandair was using PBY Catalinas and Twin Otters on domestic routes in Greenland, and from 1965 with the Sikorsky S-61 helicopters.

In the 1960s and 1970s Greenlandair and SAS were operating with Douglas DC-6s and Icelandair with B727s in Greenland, and in the 80's SAS was using DC-8s at Narsarsuaq. Since 1 January 1988 the Narsarsuaq Airport has been operated by Mittarfeqarfiit, the Greenland Airport Administration. Ice-observations are still based at Narsarsuaq and carried out with the AS350 Eurocopter aircraft.

Decline


The small airliners serving Narsarsuaq take off to the southwest, flying over Tunulliarfik Fjord, to then U-turn towards the east over Johan Dahl Land.
The small airliners serving Narsarsuaq take off to the southwest, flying over Tunulliarfik Fjord, to then U-turn towards the east over Johan Dahl Land.

The airport served as a regional focus city for Air Greenland until the late 2000s, when tough economic conditions forced the airline to raise the low season prices several times. In 2009 the airline announced the sale of Kunuunnguaq, a Boeing 757-200, one of two airliners in the fleet, serving the Narsarsuaq-Copenhagen route. Later the same year, the airline announced the acquisition of two new STOL aircraft, de Havilland Dash-8 200, one of which would serve the newly opened triangular route between Narsarsuaq, Nuuk, and Reykjavík-Keflavík.

The new route was closed before the first flights could commence, adding to resentment amongst businesses and the community of South Greenland. The declared demand for the direct connection with Iceland was not reflected in ticket sales numbers, which contributed to the pullout decision.

With the Boeing airliner sold on 26 April 2010, the entire Kujalleq municipality, and southern Greenland in general remains without prospects for a direct connection to Copenhagen. The financial crisis of 2008-2010, the air travel disruption after the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption both contributed to lower passenger demand, while competition from Air Iceland on the route to Iceland rendered the prospected route unprofitable, leading directly to the decline in traffic in southern Greenland. Re-establishment of the direct route to Copenhagen is unlikely to happen in 2011.

Airlines and destinations


Nanoq duty-free shop operated by Pilersuisoq
Nanoq duty-free shop operated by Pilersuisoq
Airlines Destinations
Air Greenland Alluitsup Paa, Kangerlussuaq, Nanortalik, Narsaq, Paamiut, Qaqortoq
Air Iceland Reykjavík (seasonal)

Accidents and incidents

On 21 September 1977, Douglas C-47 N723A of NJ Airlines crashed at Narsarsuaq Airport.

Facilities

In the terminal there is a large cafeteria, a duty-free 'Nanoq' shop, as well as a small tourist office, which helps coordinate general aviation activities at the airport.



The above content comes from Wikipedia and is published under free licenses – click here to read more.


General Info
Country Greenland
ICAO ID BGBW
Latitude 61.160517
61° 09' 37.86" N
Longitude -45.425978
045° 25' 33.52" W
Elevation 112 feet
34 meters
Type Civil
Magnetic Variation 026° W (01/06)
Beacon Yes
Operating Agency CIVIL GOVERNMENT, (LANDING FEES AND DIPLOMATIC CLEARANCE MAY BE REQUIRED)


Communications
AFIS 119.1
Communications Remarks
AFIS TWO WAY RADIO COMMUNICATION WITH AFIS IS REQUIRED PRIOR TO ENGINE START AND AFISFREQUENCY IS TO BE MONITORED AT ALL TIMES WHEN ENGINES ARE RUNNING.


Runways
ID Dimensions Surface PCN ILS
07/25 5935 x 148 feet
1809 x 45 meters
CONCRETE. 043RBXU NO


Navaids
Type ID Name Channel Freq Distance From Field Bearing From Navaid
NDB NA NARSARSUAQ - 359 At Field -
DME NQ NARSARSUAQ 055Y - At Field -


Supplies/Equipment
Fuel Jet A1, without icing nhibitor.

100/130 MIL Spec, low lead, aviation gasoline (BLUE)



Thanks to: www.worldaerodata.com

The content above was published at Airports-Worldwide.com in 2010.
We don't guarantee the information is fresh and accurate. The data may be wrong or outdated.
For more up-to-date information please refer to other sources.













Please see some ads intermixed with other content from this site:












christianity portal
directory of hotels worldwide
 
 

Copyright 2004-2018 © by Airports-Worldwide.com
Legal Disclaimer