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Vostok (rocket family)

By Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vostok_rocket

Vostok

Vostok 8K72K rocket on display in Moscow
Function Carrier rocket
Manufacturer RKK Energia
Country of origin  Soviet Union
Size
Stages 2
Capacity
Payload to
LEO
4,725 kilograms (10,420 lb)
Associated rockets
Family R-7
Comparable Atlas
Titan
Launch history
Status Retired
Launch sites Baikonur: LC-1/5, 31/6
Plesetsk: LC-41/1, 43/3, 43/4
Total launches Vostok-L: 4
Vostok-K: 13
Vostok-2: 45
Vostok-2M: 94
Soyuz/Vostok: 2
Successes Vostok-L: 3
Vostok-K: 11
Vostok-2: 40
Vostok-2M: 92
Soyuz/Vostok: 2
Failures Vostok-L: 1
Vostok-K: 2
Vostok-2: 5
Vostok-2M: 2
Maiden flight 15 May 1960 (Vostok-L)
Last flight 29 August 1991 (Vostok-2M)
Notable payloads Vostok
Zenit
Meteor
Boosters (Vostok-K)
No boosters 4
Engines 1 RD-107-8D74-1959
Thrust 970.86 kN
Total thrust 3,883.4 kN
Burn time 118 seconds
Fuel RP-1/LOX
First Stage (Vostok-K)
Engines 1 RD-108-8D75-1959
Thrust 912 kN
Burn time 301 seconds
Fuel RP-1/LOX
Second Stage (Vostok-K)
Engines 1 RD-0109
Thrust 54.5 kN
Burn time 365 seconds
Fuel RP-1/LOX

Vostok (Russian Восток, translated as "East") was a family of rockets derived from the Soviet R-7 Semyorka ICBM designed for the human spaceflight programme but later used for other satellite launches. It was a subset of the R-7 family of rockets.

On March 18, 1980 a Vostok-2M rocket exploded on its launch pad at Plesetsk during a fueling operation, killing 48. An investigation into a similar – but avoided – accident revealed that the substitution of lead-based for tin-based solder in hydrogen peroxide filters had resulted in the breakdown of the H2O2 and the resulting explosion.

Versions

The major versions of the rocket were:

Gallery

Vostok 8K72K

  • Stage Number: 1 - Strap-on Boosters; 4 x Vostok 8K72K-0
    • Gross Mass: 43,300 kg
    • Empty Mass: 3,710 kg
    • Thrust (vac): 4 x 99,000 kgf (971 kN) = 3.88 MN
    • Isp: 313 s (3.07 kN·s/kg)
    • Burn time: 118 s
    • Isp(sl): 256 s (2.51 kN·s/kg)
    • Diameter: 2.68 m
    • Span: 8.35 m
    • Length: 19.00 m
    • Propellants: Lox/Kerosene
    • Engines: 1 x RD-107-8D74-1959 per booster = 4
  • Stage Number: 2 - Core stage; 1 x Vostok 8K72K-1
    • Gross Mass: 100,400 kg
    • Empty Mass: 6,800 kg
    • Thrust (vac): 912 kN
    • Isp: 315 s (3.09 kN·s/kg)
    • Burn time: 301 s
    • Isp(sl): 248 s (2.43 kN·s/kg)
    • Diameter: 2.99 m
    • Length: 28.00 m
    • Propellants: Lox/Kerosene
    • Engine: 1 x RD-108-8D75-1959
  • Stage Number: 3 - Final stage; 1 x Vostok 8K72K-2
    • Gross Mass: 7,775 kg
    • Empty Mass: 1,440 kg
    • Thrust (vac): 54.5 kN
    • Isp: 326 s (3.20 kN·s/kg)
    • Burn time: 365 s
    • Diameter: 2.56 m
    • Span: 2.56 m
    • Length: 2.84 m
    • Propellants: Lox/Kerosene
    • Engine: 1 x RD-0109

See also

Ariane 5 · Atlas V · Delta (II · IV· Dnepr-1 · GSLV · H-IIA · Kaituozhe-1 · Kosmos-3M · Long March (1D · 2C · 2D · 2F · 3A · 3B · 3C · 4B · 4C· Minotaur I · Molniya-M · Paektusan · Pegasus · Proton (K · M· PSLV · Rokot · Safir · Shavit · Shtil' · Start-1 · Strela · Soyuz (U · FG · 2· Taurus · Unha · VLS-1 · Volna · Zenit (2 · 2M · 3SL · 3SLB)




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Published - July 2009














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