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Aircraft spotting

By Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_spotting


Spotters at São Paulo/Guarulhos International Airport control tower.
Spotters at São Paulo/Guarulhos International Airport control tower.

Taking a photograph of an Aeroflot Boeing 767
Taking a photograph of an Aeroflot Boeing 767

Aircraft spotting or plane spotting is the observation and logging registration numbers of aircraft: gliders, powered aircraft, balloons, airships, helicopters, and microlights.

When spotting aircraft observers notice the key attributes of an aircraft. They may notice a distinctive noise from its engine or the number of vapour trails it is leaving. They will assess the size of the aircraft and the number, type and position of its engines. Another clue is the position of wings relative to the fuselage and the degree to which they are swept rearwards. Are the wings above the fuselage, below it, or fixed at midpoint, perhaps it is a biplane or triplane. The position of the tailplane relative to the fin(s) and the shape of the fin are also clues to its type. If it is an antique or light aircraft it might have a tail wheel. Some aircraft types have a fixed undercarriage while others have retractable wheels.

Other features include the speed, cockpit placement, colour scheme or special equipment that changes the silhouette of the aircraft. Taken together these clues will enable the identification of an aircraft. If the observer is familiar with the airfield being used by the aircraft and its normal traffic patterns, he or she is more likely to leap quickly to a decision about the aircraft's identity - they may have seen the same type of aircraft from the same angle many times.

Spotting styles


Photographers watching the landing of a SriLankan Airlines Airbus A340 at London Heathrow Airport.
Photographers watching the landing of a SriLankan Airlines Airbus A340 at London Heathrow Airport.

Some spotters will note and compile the markings, a national insignia or airline livery or logo perhaps, a squadron badge or code letters in the case of a military aircraft. Published manuals allow more information to be deduced, such as the delivery date or the manufacturer's construction number. Camouflage markings differ, depending on the surroundings in which that aircraft is expected to operate.

Ancillary activities might include listening-in to air traffic transmissions (using radio scanners, where that is legal), liaising with other "spotters" to clear up uncertainties as to what aircraft have been seen at specific times or in particular places.

The hobbyist might travel long distances to visit a different airport from their usual one, to see an unusual aircraft or to view the remains of aircraft withdrawn from use. Some aircraft may eventually be placed in the care of museums (see Aviation archaeology) - or perhaps be cannibalised in order to repair a similar aircraft already preserved.

Some spotters are competitive and may get a thrill from seeing all the aircraft of a particular operator, military or civil. Aircraft registrations can be found in serial books, such as Military Aircraft Serial Review, or magazines, like Scramble.

The English and Dutch spotters are usually considered as the most inveterate in their field.

During hostilities

During World War II and the subsequent Cold War some countries encouraged their citizens to become "plane spotters" in an "observation corps" or similar public body for reasons of public security. Britain had the Royal Observer Corps which operated between 1925 and 1995.

Air shows

Air shows usually draw large numbers of spotters as it is a chance to enter airfields and Air Force Bases worldwide that are usually closed to the public and to see displayed aircraft at close range. The most popular event in Europe is the Royal International Air Tattoo in the United Kingdom.

Legal ramifications


The high engine position on this USAF A-10 Thunderbolt makes identification easy
The high engine position on this USAF A-10 Thunderbolt makes identification easy

The legal repercussions of the hobby were dramatically shown in November 2001 when fourteen aircraft spotters (twelve British, two Dutch) were arrested by Greek police after being observed at an open day at the Greek Air Force base at Kalamata. They were charged with espionage, and faced a possible 20-year prison sentence if found guilty. After being held for six weeks, they were eventually released on £9,000 bail, and the charges reduced to the misdemeanour charge of illegal information collection. Confident of their innocence they returned for their trial in April 2002 and were stunned to be found guilty, with eight of the group sentenced to three years, the rest for one year. At their appeal a year later all were acquitted .

Fight against terrorism

In the wake of the targeting of airports by terrorists, enthusiasts' organisations and the police in the UK have co-operated in drawing up a code of conduct. This attempts to allow enthusiasts to continue their hobby and to increase security around airports, by asking enthusiasts to contact police if they believe something they see or hear is suspicious.

Extraordinary rendition

Following the events of 9/11 information collected by planespotters helped uncover what is known as extraordinary rendition by the CIA. Information on unusual movements of rendition aircraft provided data which led first to news reports and then to a number of governmental and inter-governmental investigations.

See also


Spotters and photographers enjoy seeing aircraft in special colour schemes. This is a Boeing 747-400 of Malaysia Airlines
Spotters and photographers enjoy seeing aircraft in special colour schemes. This is a Boeing 747-400 of Malaysia Airlines

Bibliography

External links




Text from Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License; additional terms may apply.


Published - July 2009














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